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Australian Frogs

As frogs go, many Australian Frogs are not as colourful as some in other parts of the world. However, they are just as crucial to the ecosystem. They are an essential part of the food chain, both as predators and food supplies for other animals, particularly reptiles.

Water bodies such as lakes, streams, rivers and wetlands provide habitat. As such, they are excellent indicators of water quality. A decline in numbers is one of the first signs that an environment is less than healthy.

Australia is home to 240 species of frogs, the only amphibians in Australia. Sadly, numbers are declining at an alarming rate due to habitat loss, pollution and other factors. In addition, a deadly disease, Chytridiomycosis, caused by two forms of Chytrid fungus, is having a devastating impact on frog populations.

Motorbike Frog (Litoria moorei)

Motorbike Frog (Litoria moorei)

The Motorbike Frog is the most common frog found in the southwest region of Western Australia found in local lakes and swamps. Getting its name from the call, which is reminiscent of a motorbike changing gears, they call in the breeding season.

Pobblebonk Frog (Limnodynastes dorsalis)

Pobblebonk Frog (Limnodynastes dorsalis)

If you live in Western Australia’s southwest, you may never have seen this frog, but you may have heard its call. The origin of the common name, ‘Pobblebonk’, is the loud solitary bonk sound made during the breeding season. It is also called the Western Banjo Frog.

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